From the very beginning, we knew Corporate Rebels needed to be more than a blog, more than a source of inspiration, and more than a collection of practices, case studies and transformation stories.

We set out to build a global movement of like-minded individuals: individuals in a relentless pursuit to make work more fun.

While our reach continues to grow, we’re working hard to make the movement bigger, bolder and better. We’re ready for the next step—and we need your help.

A true movement

We’ve talked for a long time about “building a movement”. And while we’re proud of what we’ve achieved, we are aware that there’s much more to do. We continue to research pioneering workplaces, and we continue to share the inspiration through blogsbooks, and talks. Beyond that, we’ll double down on building the movement. In the upcoming months and years we’ll turn Corporate Rebels into a platform for a revolution.

We envision a globally connected, yet highly distributed, network of local “Rebel Cells”. In these cells, like-minded rebels can connect, share, learn, and act to change workplaces for the better.

Some time after the launch of the new website, we’ll launch another feature, “Rebel Cells”. The cells can organize meet-ups, run change experiments and launch local initiatives to make work more fun.Click To Tweet

Important note: we’re not talking about meet-ups with endless talks, discussions, and conversations. There are enough of those group therapy sessions already. But, unfortunately, there’s little to show for it. Revolution is what we need.

The more rebels collaborate locally, the more impact we will have on the world of work. Shared purpose and shared consciousness, combined with decentralized execution, is what makes movements successful.

Or, as movement-researcher Greg Satell writes: “While we usually notice successful movements after they have begun to attract large crowds and hold massive demonstrations, those are effects, not causes, of successful mobilization. It is when small groups connect — which has become exponentially easier in the digital age — that they gain their power.”

If we succeed in that, Corporate Rebels will truly become a movement that changes workplaces for the better.

We need your help

In order to build that movement, we’re working on some new stuff. This summer, we’ll launch a new website that will make it much easier for people to connect. It includes a knowledge database and a forum for sharing knowledge and ideas. We believe this is a powerful first step in creating a platform for the revolution.

Some time after the launch of the new website, we’ll launch another feature, “Rebel Cells”. This will allow people to set up or join a local rebel cell. The cells can organize meet-ups, run change experiments and launch local initiatives to make work more fun.

At the moment, we’re working on the details of these. Ellen – intern turned full-time rebel – has been doing research and is working with various people around the globe to fine-tune our ideas. For that, we can use your help. In two ways:

1. Examples of movements

We’re looking for examples of global movements to draw inspiration from. Which movements are doing interesting things? What are they doing well? What technologies/methods/infrastructures are they leveraging?

Don’t limit your thinking to the business world. Also think of movements related to hobbies, politics, sports, and beyond. Anything you can share is much appreciated.

Important note: we’re not talking about meet-ups with endless talks, discussions, and conversations. There are enough of those group therapy sessions already. But, unfortunately, there’s little to show for it. Revolution is what we need.Click To Tweet

2. What do you need?

We believe our role is to facilitate the global movement. To do that in the best way possible, let us know your answers to the questions below.

  • Why would you join a local cell?
  • What would you need to turn ideas into action in your workplace?
  • What do you need from us?

Republished with permission.

Featured Image from Corporate Rebels, proportions changed by EE Magazine.

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